What is an all natural fiber backpacker’s clothing set made of? Would wool and waxed cotton work even for backpacking in rain and cold conditions. Check this out to see what I packet for a four day trip in November in Linville Gorge Wilderness, Western North Carolina 

My gear included:

Base Layer:

  • Merino wool top and bottom (2 for bottoms)
  • Merino bandana (2)
  • Merino Scarf

Insulation Layer:

  • Heavy Wool Sweater (handwoven in the Himalayas)
  • Wool Socks—3 pairs (one for only sleeping, one for wearing, one for washing)
  • Wool Finger Mitts

Shell Layer:

  • Waxed Cotton Parka with hood
  • Waxed Cotton Pants
  • Rain Layer:
  • Synthetic Poncho with hood
  • Felted Wool Hat

I carefully packed my gear into my backpack and decided what I would wear vs. what I would protect and need later. I knew that whatever I wear may become completely soaked.

What went on my body was:

  • One layer of merino base layer for top and bottom (base layer)
  • One pair wool socks with leather Minimalist Boots 
  • Waxed Cotton Pants and Parka (shell layer)
  • Wool Finger Gloves
  • Merino Bandana on my head
  • Wide brimmed wool felt hat
  • Waterproof Synthetic poncho

What went in the waterproof stuck sack in my backpack was:

  • Lucky Sheep Rewilder Wool Sleeping Bag (four pounds)
  • Wool sweater (two pounds)
  • One Merino Bottom Base Layer
  • 2 Pairs of wool socks

The rest of my pack was exposed to the rain. My food, cooking kit and first aid kit was wrapped in ziplock bags could get wet. My tent and groundcloth were already wet and packed on the outside pockets of the backpack. I put my lunch, water, and stove fuel in an outside pocket. That’s about all I had with me.